Wednesday, 16 January 2008

I'm so excited

And I just can't hide it. It's not Lichtenhainer that's getting me worked. Nor my DDR label scans that I finally found this evening. Something much more momentous is the reason for my excitement.

Tomorrow I'm off to Bodegraven to see one of my beers brewed. Not quite sure which it will be (Whitbread Porter or SSS). It should be a memorable experience even though I do have to get up at some ungodly hour. I'll tell you all about it in tomorrow's post.

Bit of a short post today, so here are some of the DDR labels I meant to share with you earlier in the week.
























7 comments:

hey_kevin said...

Which Whitbread porter recipe? 1933?

Sounds fun!

Ron Pattinson said...

1914. It looks a goody. Surprisingly for the date, it's pretty much at the classic strength. The 1933 one is just too weak, unless you're do it a cask-conditioned.

hey_kevin said...

What's the grist/gravity on that one. You're right the 1933 porter is pretty dark weak. It's too bad I don't know anyone heading to Amsterdam soon, as I've got a couple bottles of the 1933 porter left (og 1027)

Other things I've brewed that have been inspired by your blog are my own version of the 1919 Barclay Perkins mild with both amber 10% and crystal ~5%. I couldn't make myself put maize in it so I just went with %15 sugar. 1 was an amber belgian candi sugar and the other was with sorghum syrup (for my own fun, no historical reasons for that)

I just brewed a version of the 1933 Whitbread mild for the BBB hombrew board sugar swap. I'm excited to see how that one turns out.

I need to figure out what my next historical project will entail, any beers you are super curious about? I'm thinking porter and late 1800's but haven't made any decisions yet.

cheers,

Kevin

Ron Pattinson said...

The 1914 Porter is in the low 1050's. I would really liked to have tried the 1933 Porter. It's not a beer I think anyone would take on commercially.

That Barclay Perkins Mild had really intrigued me. How did it taste?

You're a low OG fan, aren't you? Nothing wrong with that. I would imagine quite tricky to get right, too.

Ales. That's what I would like to know more about. Burton, for example. Whitbread XXX or Barclay Perkins KK. Or one of the Brown Ales from between the wars.

Ron Pattinson said...

Oh and Stitch, the original Brown Ale from the 18th century. 100% brown malt is the grist.

hey_kevin said...

I usually tend brew to the lower end of the OG scale. It's best to stay reasonably sober while taking care of my kids (4.5 and 1.5) and that is best done while drinking weaker beer. That doesn't mean I don't occasionally brew something a bit stronger. I was a bit intrigued by the Truman Country Runner from 1850, though I'm not sure if that's more due to the name than the recipe.

The mild with the amber malt was pretty interesting. The amber malt gave it a nice toasty character.

cheers,

Kevin

Ron Pattinson said...

Looking after my kids drives me to strong beer. It's good someone is pretty the less obviously sexy recipes.

Country Runner - it does have a ring to it. That reminds me that I should get on with the Truman's logs I have photographed. There not that easy to read and I don't know the format well. That's what's put me off going through them.