Monday, 5 January 2009

Bass bottled beers 1921 – 1938

As promised, details of Bass bottled beers between the wars.

There are a few that I haven't seen postwar: Amber Ale and No.5 Burton Ale. Others, like Barley Wine (No.1 Ale, I assume) and Imperial Stout (P2, I guess) are more familiar. Anyway, here are the numbers:


The Prince's Ale was an interesting one to see. It looks very much like a version of No.1.

As for the resemblance between Bass and Worthington beers after their merger (as mentioned by Zythophile): you'll have to wait until I get around to transcribing the Worthington entries from the Gravity Book. Probably later this week.

Before I forget, I wanted to point out the high degree of attenuation of all the beers, epart from Imperial Stout. It's also worth noting that the gravity of Bass No. 1 doesn't appear to have been reduced at all during the 20th century. Very unusual. Even Barclay's Russian Stout (the doemstic version) was significantly weaker in the 1930's than it had been pre WW I.

4 comments:

zythophile said...

The Prince's Ale was an interesting one to see. It looks very much like a version of No.1

If it was the same as the King's Ale, then it was ...

ealusceop said...

Brewed by his son!

:)

zythophile said...

Errr (or ER) - his grandson, I believe, that is, Edward VII set the mash in action for King's Ale and the man who was briefly Edward VIII in the Year of the Three Kings did the same for Prince's Ale.

I have a bottle of King's Ale - unfortunately the cork is oozing and something very nasty-looking is growing through the wax seal ...

zythophile said...

Errr (or ER) - his grandson, I believe, that is, Edward VII set the mash in action for King's Ale and the man who was briefly Edward VIII in the Year of the Three Kings did the same for Prince's Ale.

I have a bottle of King's Ale - unfortunately the cork is oozing and something very nasty-looking is growing through the wax seal ...