Saturday, 21 February 2009

MIld! available for purchase


A second of my Mini Books is now available for purchase: Mild! Look to your left and you'll see that a copy of Mild! is just a few mouse clicks away.

It's taken a good deal of shouting to get it into a fit state to publish. I've been having terrible problems with page numbers. These have now been fixed. Though mending the broken family relationships it caused could take a while longer.

I'll be making the other books in the series available as they are published. Actually, a short time after they've been published. I want time to distribute the numbered copies first.

10 comments:

THOMAS 'Tom' CIZAUSKAS said...

Looking forward to reading it.

ealusceop said...

I'm eager to see the one about Brown Ale, will buy one sure!
:)

Oblivious said...

Bought my copy

Ron Pattinson said...

ealuscop, you'll have a long wait for my book about Brown Ale. I think you mean Brown Beer, which isd about something totally different.

Tom and Oblivious, I'd be interested in your comments on the book.

Oblivious said...

My hardback copy arrived at lunch time today

Gavin Davis said...

Just bought your book this weekend, I was particularly interested in your discussions on the history of the colour of Mild. Coming from North Warwickshire I grew up on Dark Mild, Light/Pale mild would have been an oxymoron to me in my youth. In Frank Ballie's Beer Drinkers Companion he refers to the Midlands as being known for its Light Milds. I know that Ansell’s used to produce a Light Mild for the Potteries in the early Seventies and you could still get M&B DPA in North Warks in the early Nineties though it was virtually unknown in Birmingham. He says that M&B produced a Light Mild, with no reference to Dark Mild, and that Batham's produced a Light Mild and a strong Dark Mild. Apart from maybe Banks's, perhaps the All Nation's Pale ale, and Dunkirk Pale Ale, Mild in the Midlands was always a dark beer when I was drinking. I was, though, drinking under age at least 14 years after his book. What do you think? I apologise for my excessively long posts

Ron Pattinson said...

Gavin, I can remember drinking DPA or Dunkirk Pale Ale in the 1970's. It came fro mthe SPringfield brewery in Wolverhampton, didn't it?

Banks's is an interesting colour. Barclay Perkins used to have Milds of a similar shade, somewhere between pale and dark.

Gavin Davis said...

Not sure about Springfield. The 1977 GBG lists it under Cape Hill. It was originally brewed or at least named after Darby's Dunkirk Brewery, Greets Green, West Bromwich. They were taken over by M&B in 1951. Apparently the brewery was famed for it's Dinner Ale.

Gavin Davis said...

What sort of period were Barclay Perkins producing those Milds? did they produce any darker ones? It was mostly M&B and Ansell's when I first started drinking, Banks's really confused me. It really interests me how parochial local tastes can be, something I think we have lost in our beer culture. I was just reading about Batham's history. They only porduced Mild until 1951 but after buying the Swan Inn at Chaddesley Corbett they started to produce their pale Bitter to the suite the tastes of North Worcestershire palates. I know NW and Manchester brewers often used to make their Milds darker for the Welsh and Liverpooi markets, and some East Yorkshire Brewers used to make lighter Milds for the West Riding.

Ron Pattinson said...

In the 1920's and 1930's Barclay Perkins had two colours of Milds. Though in the same period the other London breweries Milds seem to have been dark.

The Swan Inn at Chaddesley Corbett. That brinds back memories. I used to sometimes drink there in the 1970's. Great pub and great beer.