Thursday, 24 December 2009

1864 Christmas beer

Did I mention that I own one brewing log? From Lovibond, a small London brewer. Browsing I happened upon a very special XXXX Ale. For Christmas, though it was brewed in October.

Here's the recipe:

6 comments:

mentaldental said...

What would the log mean by white malt? An air-dried malt?

Also where the hops added in the order listed, ie all the americans early on, the kents at the end? Seems likely because it would remove that nasty american flavour! ;-)

Rod said...

Thanks for this - I live in Greenwich and pass by the old Lovibond's brewery building (still there, BTW) practically every day. They seem to have been a real quality-focussed brewery, and it's a tragedy that they are no longer brewing here in Greenwich.
Although, at least Greenwich still has a brewery, which is more than many places, alas...
Merry Christmas, Ron and all!!!

Oblivious said...

Was white malt lower not a coloured malt with higher distatic activity?

A 50:50 ratio of lager to pale malt is supposed to get you in the ball park according to Durden Park Beer Circle

Ron Pattinson said...

What was white malt? Let's see what Mr. Ling and Mr. Sykes say:

White malt. Made from the very best and palest malt and dried at a low temperature. This type of malt was no longer made very often.
(Source: "Principles & Practice of Brewing" by Walter J. Sykes & Arthur R. Ling, 1907, page 469.)

Lovibond's sometimes used white malt, sometimes just pale malt. I guess white malt was used in the XXXX because it was a special, expensive beer.

zythophile said...

A bit late this, but - Rod, Ron's book is from the OTHER London Lovibond's, in Fulham …

StuartP said...

Hello.
I'm not sure if anyone has told you but the Lovibond's name has been revived in Henley. Jeff Rosenmeier (an American import but damn good chap) certainly brews distinctive beers, and is the sort who might share some 21st century recipes with you - I've got his Henley Gold recipe.
Thanks for the Lovibond XXXX recipe: right up my street for an historical recreation.