Tuesday, 30 August 2011

Hugh Baird malts, 8th March 1938

You know what's been missing here recently? Ridiculous levels of ridiculously specific details. Time to put that right. If I'm not careful, I might get some new readers.

The Thomas Usher Gravity Book. You know those books for keeping kids quiet on their holidays? The Bumper Book of Fun or some such. That's what the Usher Gravity Book is for me. Something to slip into my hands on a rainy Mablethorpe Tuesday. Assuming the Mermaid isn't open yet. The beautiful weather this summer has provided plenty of opportunities to immerse myself in its funerificness.

I'm mostly there for the beer details, natch. But I can't help myself being drawn by the hypnotic gaze of other numbers. I'm such a tart. I like these ones so much, I've put them into a table. This table:


Analysis of malts from Hugh Baird, 8th March 1938
Name of malt extract per 336 lbs (lbs) moisture C.W.E. D.P. colour
Own Scotch 99.8 1.5% 18.6% 35º 5º L
??'s Scotch 98.2 1.7% 19.0% 36º 6.5º L
Gaza 83.6 1.4% 14.7% 27º 4º L
Chilean 91 1.8% 17.0% 34º 6º L
Aust. Corfu 86.4 1.4% 15.5% 28º 4º L
Calif 88.1 2.4% 15.6% 29º 4.5º L
???? 92.3 1.2% 17.0% 34º 6º L
Egyptian 83.9 1.0% 16.5% 31º 5º L
Source:
Document TU/6/11 held at the Scottish Brewing Archive.

I was surprised to see that the Scotch malt gave the best extract. And had the greatest diastatic power.

I'd wondered what C.W.E. stood for. Then an idea , rather like a carelessly thrown mackerel, struck me. Why not look at the malt analyses in Lloyd Hind. They might include  a similar column. And it's a good excuse to include a second table. This one:

2 row Malts in the 1930's                                                                                         

Pale Ale malts
Mild Ale malts
malt from foreign 2-row barley

Spratt-Archer
Plumage-Archer
Plumage-Archer
Spratt-Archer
Yorkshire plumage
Moravian
Chilean Chevalier
Bohemian Hanna
moisture %
1.5
1.8
1.7
2.1
2
1.8
1.6
2.5
Extract, lb. 336 lb
100.5
100.6
100.6
99
99.4
98.9
99.9
99.8
colour, 1 inch cell
4.5
4
6.5
6
7
6.5
6.5
4
cold water extract %
18
18.7
19.1
18.7
17.7
17.1
18.7
20.2
diastatic activity Lº
36
37
32
35
32
37
38
35
extract on dry malt
102
102.4
102.3
101.1
101.4
100.7
101.5
102.3
total nitrogen % on dry malt
1.342
1.314
1.322
1.4
1.469
1.518
1.48
1.52
PSN %
0.51
0.509
0.488
0.541
0.469
0.562
0.618
0.6
PSN % on total nitrogen
38
38.7
36.9
38.6
33.3
36.9
41.8
39.5
PSN % on total wort solids
0.67
0.67
0.64
0.72
0.65
0.75
0.82
0.79
Source:
"Brewing Science & Practice" H. Lloyd Hind, 1943, p. 254, 256 & 258
Notes:
PSN = permanently Soluble Nitrogen

Cold Water Extract. That's what C.W.E. stands for. Doesn't make me much the wiser.

I was going to do the old compare and contrast bit. But there's precious little contrast. The two sets of numbers are pretty damn similar. Only the extract seems a bit low in the case of some of Usher's samples. Bit disappointing that. leaves me a bit . . . . er . . . . . speechless.

4 comments:

Ed said...

Cold water extract is basically a measure of the amount of sugar in the malt before mashing. It's a way of how seeing well modified the malt is.

Barm said...

Is CWE not some sort of cold-water mash technique to help analyse malt?

Don't start transcribing the Wm Younger gravity book too, I've made a start on that.

Anonymous said...

Chevalier should be Chevallier. Interesting to see it was being grown as far away as Chile. Also interesting to see "Yorkshire plumage" - the landrace ancestor of Plumage Archer - still being grown in the 1930s.

Thomas Barnes said...

@Ed. More specifically, its a method of measuring sugars and soluble starches in malt before mashing. Sugars wand soluble starches will dissolve in cold water, most starches starches won't. It's the difference between putting sugar in a glass of cold water and putting in corn starch.

Since sugars are really simple carbohydrates (1-3 molecules in length), and soluble starches are relatively simple carbs (4- ~10 molecules) CWE is a decent method of determining the degree of modification the malt has undergone. The enzymes in more highly modified malt have had more time to break complex starches into simple starches and sugars.