Tuesday, 31 January 2012

William Younger adverts from the 1920's (part five)

I wasn't kidding when I said I was going to run this theme into the ground. And keep on going until I hit the earth's molten iron core.

This set is an odd let. See what you think.




"WE understand you have discovered the secret of eternal youth."
Father William: "Rather ! I get YOUNGER every day."

WILLIAM YOUNGER'S SCOTCH ALE has been a favourite beverage for nearly 200 years. Robbie Burns, the great Scots poet, drank it for the same reason that good judges drink it now— because there is no other malt liquor to equal it.

A foaming tankard of this rich brown Ale gives the crowning touch to a hearty meal.

William Younger's
Scotch Ale
Brewed in Edinburgh
The beer with a bite in it.

Branches at London, Manchester, Leeds, Newcastle, Middlesbrough.
Nottingham Evening Post - Thursday 4 December 1924, page 2.

Are these three respectable old gentlemen real people or just from the cartoonist's fantasy? I suspect they're real. And connected with eternal youth. I'm sure one of you clever lot can help me out.

An unexpected use of the term malt liquor in there. It gradually fell out of use, except in legal formulations, in the 19th century as the distinction between Ale and Beer blurred. It's particularly odd in this context, which is informal. I really can't see why it's been used here, other than to sound posh.

"Rich brown Ale" sounds more like the No. 3 I know. Had it changed colour or are all of these descriptions just advertising copy, not necessarily closely linked with reality?



On bleak cold nights, to keep you snug,
Scotch Ale's as good as an extra rug.

"I'm going to get YOUNGER every day this year."

William Younger's
Scotch Ale
Brewed in Edinburgh
The beer with a bite in it.

Branches at London, Manchester, Leeds, Newcastle, Middlesbrough.
Nottingham Evening Post - Friday 9 January 1925, page 4.

This is a different variation on the Father William getting YOUNGER riff. This time he's alone. There aren't even any fallacious health claims. Nice little rhyme. Must try to remember that. Not sure in which context I'd be able to use, but you never know.




The "YOUNGER" Generation

"Hale, Hearty and Happy we be,
Younger's SCOTCH ALE is the ale for we."

IT is more than the flavour that makes Wm. Younger's SCOTCH ALE so popular. There are hidden qualities. Its power to invigorate; to cheer; to give zest to life, make SCOTCH ALE a first favourite. It is a malt liquor; in general opinion, unsurpassed on any point. Order supplies and you will agree that this is true.

William Younger's
Scotch Ale
Brewed in Edinburgh
The beer with a bite in it.

Wm. Younger & Co. Ltd., London Stores, 49 Belvedere Road, London, SE 1. London, Manchester, Leeds, Newcastle, Middlesbrough.
Nottingham Evening Post - Wednesday 20 February 1924, page 6.

Who are those four grinning oldies? The one second on the left reminds me of Sydney Nevile. That's him to the right. A legendary figure that spent over 70 years in the brewing industry, the latter two-thirds at Whitbread. I doubt it is really him He was only in his 50's at the time of the advert.

Any guesses as to who any of the chaps are? Or are they just fantasy old bloke figures?

Good to see all those invigorating claims back again. However bogus. And there's malt liquor again, too.

This must be one of the lamest piece of advertising copy ever: "It is a malt liquor; in general opinion, unsurpassed on any point. Order supplies and you will agree that this is true." It sounds like we're in about 1850.

This is so much more fun than fiddling with numbers and doing real research. A good enough reason to continue.

Almost forgot. I think I might have an image of the label that's on those bottles:

What do you reckon?

3 comments:

Oblivious said...

"WILLIAM YOUNGER'S SCOTCH ALE has been a favourite beverage for nearly 200 years. Robbie Burns, the great Scots poet, drank it for the same reason that good judges drink it now— because there is no other malt liquor to equal it."

I presume that they have not take account of change is base malt over that period of time?

Ron Pattinson said...

Oblivious, I don't think so. Nor all those grits.

Gary Gillman said...

The term judge here is used in the sense of one being a (good) judge of ale. The term is rarely used in this sense today, at least in my experience. But you find it extensively in matters of connoisseurship from the mid-1800's to the 1930's. After that the usage dies away. Thus, to be a "good judge of bourbon", or ale, porter, etc., was a common way to commend a person's tasting skills. Today the equivalent would be, he has a good nose, or palate.

Gary