Showing posts with label Medway Brewery. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Medway Brewery. Show all posts

Wednesday, 28 November 2012

X Ale grists in the 1860's

While I'm on the topic of grists, I may as well do the ones for the Milds I've been boring you with. They aren't all that exciting, one or two unexpected ingredients excepted.

19th-century grists can be a great disappointment to those hoping to find exciting recipes. Porter and Stout aside, most beers had very simple grists with nothing other than base malt. It's not what I'd expected to find. But, after looking at the odd few thousand brewing records, it's clear that this is just how they brewed back then.

Over-complication is a modern failing. How many current beers have recipes that are more complicated than they need to be? My guess is quite a lot. I don't want to bore you with this, but one of my favourite beers of all time, Pretty Things XXXX Mild*, has just four ingredients. That's including water and yeast.

The London X Ales definitely have the edge in terms of grist complexity. Only Barclay Perkins ones were 100% pale malt. That these beers were pale in colour is attested by the use of white malt in some. That was the palest kind of pale malt.

The Courage grists really are unusual. I'd forgotten that they included brown malt. The percentage is pretty small so I wonder what the point was. It would have added a little colour, but also flavour. I wonder which was the prime reason for its use?

The limited amount of sugar used is also worth highlighting. Sugar had been a legal ingredient since 1847, but it wasn't immediately hugely popular. Whitbread was the first of the big London brewers to adopt it in a big way, coincidentally about exactly at this time. This is when these brewers began using sugar regularly:

Whitbread 1865
Truman 1876
Barclay Perkins 1880

When we finally get to the next instalment in this series, you'll see just how much Barclay Perkins grists were transformed by the Free Mash Tun Act.

What can I say about the provincial grists? Very little as they are, with a single exception, 100% base malt. The only exception is the Medway X Ale with its small amount of crystal malt. This is a very early sighting of crystal malt. But that's another topic we'll be learning more about later.

Almost forgot my other point: the differing gravities. You can see that London X Ale was over 1060º, the provincial ones around 1050º. There's a similar gravity gap all the way up the strength scale

That's me done. I'll leave you with the tables.

London X Ale grists in the 1860's
Date Year Brewer Beer OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation lbs hops/ qtr hops lb/brl pale malt brown malt white malt sugar
14th May 1867 Barclay Perkins X 1061.2 1018.6 5.64 69.68% 9.85 2.77 100.00%
2nd Oct 1868 Barclay Perkins XX 1078.9 1024.7 7.18 68.77% 12.89 4.47 100.00%
2nd Oct 1868 Barclay Perkins XXX 1092.8 1030.2 8.28 67.46% 14.21 5.90 100.00%
8th Jul 1867 Whitbread X 1061.2 1020.2 5.42 66.97% 10.12 2.95 86.07% 13.93%
16th May 1867 Whitbread XL 1071.2 1026.0 5.97 63.42% 9.01 3.05 85.25% 14.75%
3rd Jun 1867 Whitbread XX 1082.3 1031.3 6.74 61.95% 9.09 3.21 85.96% 14.04%
3rd Jul 1865 Truman X Ale 1067.3 1013.9 7.07 79.42% 9 2.78 64.71% 35.29%
4th Jul 1865 Truman 40/- Ale 1072.6 1020.8 6.85 71.37% 9 3.00 100.00%
22nd Aug 1865 Truman XX Ale 1081.2 1020.5 8.03 74.74% 11.0 7.17 100.00%
22nd Aug 1865 Truman XXX Ale 1088.9 1022.7 8.76 74.45% 11.0 10.15 100.00%
23rd July 1867 Courage Ale X 1065.9 10.00 3.10 97.82% 2.18%
30th July 1867 Courage Ale XX 1078.9 10.00 3.71 91.90% 3.05% 5.05%
Sources:
Whitbread brewing records held at the London Metropolitan Archives document numbers LMA/4453/D/01/032 and LMA/4453/D/01/033.
Barclay Perkins brewing records held at the London Metropolitan Archives document numbers ACC/2305/1/572 and ACC/2305/08/275.
Truman brewing record held at the London Metropolitan Archives document number B/THB/C/147.
Courage brewing record held at the London Metropolitan Archives document number ACC/2305/08/275.


Provincial X Ale grists in the 1860's
Date Year Brewer Beer OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation lbs hops/ qtr hops lb/brl pale malt crystal malt white malt
1st Oct 1868 Tetley X 1047.4 1020.8 3.52 56.14% 6.00 1.11 100.00%
2nd Oct 1868 Tetley X1 1055.4 1019.4 4.76 65.00% 6.00 1.30 100.00%
5th Oct 1868 Tetley X2 1062.0 1017.7 5.86 71.43% 8.00 2.00 100.00%
19th Oct 1868 Tetley X3 1066.5 1022.2 5.86 66.67% 9.96 3.93 100.00%
17th Oct 1868 William Younger X 1053 1023 3.97 56.60% 6.30 1.36 100.00%
24th Aug 1868 William Younger XX 1057 1024 4.37 57.89% 9.58 2.25 100.00%
26th Aug 1868 William Younger XXX 1068 1028 5.29 58.82% 8.00 2.55 100.00%
18th Jun 1869 Medway X 1051.5 8.00 1.75 96.88% 3.13%
2nd Jun 1869 Medway XX 1066.8 9.00 2.63 100.00%
1864 Lovibond X Ale 1050.4 1015.5 4.62 69.23% 10.50 3.15 100.00%
1864 Lovibond XX Ale 1065.6 1015.0 6.70 77.20% 2.73 0.81 100.00%
1864 Lovibond XXX Ale 1074.2 1016.6 7.62 77.61% 6.50 1.04 100.00%
1864 Lovibond XXXX Ale 1085.3 1019.9 8.65 76.62% 10.50 2.01
100.00%
Sources:
Tetley brewing record held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service, Leeds document number WYL756/16/ACC1903
William Younger brewing record held at the Scottish Brewing Archive document number WY/6/1/2/21
Medway brewing record owned by me
Lovibond brewing record owned by me



* Dann has promised he'll be brewing it again soon. I can't wait to get my hands on some more of it.

Wednesday, 10 November 2010

Things I don't want to be lost

Another me preserving history post. Things I don't want to be lost.

It's the downside of owning real brewing records. Fearing accidental destruction, I feel the need to capture their contents. Responsibility. Just what I hate. My life has been an extended game of hide and seek with responsibility. Now I'm it.


Amuse yourself in decoding it, should the fancy take you. Now it's been nailed firmly to the wall of history, my work is done.

Monday, 4 October 2010

Medway Brewery beers

Here, as promised, the first results from the Medway Brewery log.


Medway Brewery beers
Date Year Beer Style OG lbs hops/ qtr hops lb/brl barrels lbs hops qtrs malt boil time (hours) boil time (hours) Pitch temp pale malt brown malt black malt crystal malt no. 2 sugar total
2nd Jun 1869 XX Mild 1066.8 9.00 2.63 48 126 14 1.5 1.5 60º 100.00%



100.00%
7th Jun 1869 X Mild 1049.9 7.88 1.70 74 126 16 1.5 1.5 60º 96.88%

3.13%
100.00%
11th Jun 1869 Porter Porter 1054.3 10.42 2.66 60 224 21.5 1.5 1.5 60º 79.37% 15.00% 5.63%

100.00%
11th Jun 1869 Stout Stout 1073.4 10.42 3.59 18 224 21.5 1.5 1.5 60º 79.37% 15.00% 5.63%

100.00%
12th Jun 1869 X Mild 1050.7 8.00 1.78 72 128 16 1.5 1.5 60º 96.88%

3.13%
100.00%
14th Jun 1869 X Mild 1050.7 8.00 1.85 78 144 18 1.5 1.5 61º 97.22%

2.78%
100.00%
15th Jun 1869 Porter Porter 1051.5 10.29 2.61 69 180 17.5 1.5 1.5 60º 79.26% 13.83% 6.91% 0.00%
100.00%
17th Jun 1869 X Mild 1050.1 8.00 1.80 71 128 16 1.5 1.5 60º 96.88%

3.13%
100.00%
18th Jun 1869 X Mild 1051.5 8.00 1.75 73 128 16 1.5 1.5 60º 96.88%

3.13%
100.00%
29th Jul 1869 B Beer Pale Ale 1049.6 18.94 3.83 72 276 14.57 1.5 1.5 60º 82.21%


17.79% 100.00%
28th Aug 1869 BA Pale Ale 1065.8 16.47 4.62 52 240 14.57 1.5 1.5 60º 82.21%


17.79% 100.00%
20th Oct 1870 TA Table Beer 1034.3 13.00 1.77 21.5 195 15 1.5 1.5 62º 100.00%



100.00%
20th Oct 1870 TB Table Beer 1045.4 13.00 2.34 67 195 15 1.5 1.5 62º 100.00%



100.00%
28th Oct 1870 IPA IPA 1066.5 16.00 4.71 68 320 20 1.5 1.5 º 100.00%



100.00%
Source:
Medway Brewery Brewing Journal


There's nothing particularly odd there. The gravities are about what I would have expected. Though it did strike me that only a couple of the Pale Ales included sugar. This isn't so unusual for the period. Initially, sugar seems to have been mostly used to lighten the body (and colour, too, I suppose) of Pale Ales. It's not until a couple of decades later that it started turning up in Porter and Mild Ale.

Feel free to add some analysis of your own. Me, I've got other things to be getting on with.

Saturday, 2 October 2010

I'm an idiot

Remember that brewing journal I picked up a couple of weeks ago? The one from the Medway. I've just realised which brewery it is.

At the time the journal was used (1869 and 1870), the name of the company was the Medway Brewery. Later it was known as Style & Co. In 1899, after merging with Winch & Sons of Chatham, it became Style & Winch.

The same Style & Winch that Barclay Perkins bought in 1929. It operated as their subsidiary for more than 40 years.

If I'd known that, I'd have been even keener to buy it. Just for the Barclay Perkins connection. I feel an idiot for not having noticed until now.

I've been harvesting the first details from the journal. Details will follow soon.

Wednesday, 22 September 2010

New book

My latest purchase just arrived. Not really a book. A brewing journal. It couldn't be in better hands.

I bought it at an auction. Online. I won't tell you how much it cost. Too embarrassing. And Dolores occasionally reads this blog.

I'd been starting to worry that it had been lost in the post. It had been in transit for a couple of weeks.

Here's a special bonus for you. I've only had the volume in my possession for two hours. Not had chance to look at the contents properly. But here's a photo of one of the pages.

It contains two brews, XX and X, But that's as much as I've looked at


Go on. Have the first go at extracting the information.

Someone has to help me out. I've been snapping brewing records pretty frantically. You know something? I'm never going to make a dent in the stuff in archives. Not really.